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JavaScript JavaScript Loops, Arrays and Objects Tracking Multiple Items with Arrays Two-Dimensional Arrays

Yemaya Re
PLUS
Yemaya Re
Courses Plus Student 1,922 Points

Advice: First design/developer job

Can anyone give advice on when someone may be 'ready' to apply for first job in design/development? I can build a decent functional website with HTML and CSS and I'm now working my way through this JS track and it's going well, however, there are so many little things I'm still unclear on regarding development in general. I'm VERY eager to get on my feet and on my own, needless to say, I could use a better job sooner than later. When should I start applying? When do you think someone is ready?

Also, I know a couple of job titles are junior/associate web developer. But I also kept seeing software engineer... is that the same thing? What other job titles would you recommend to someone who is just starting out?

You may not be able to answer all of my questions but any advice would be appreciated. Thanks so much team!

2 Answers

stjarnan
seal-mask
.a{fill-rule:evenodd;}techdegree seal-36
stjarnan
Front End Web Development Techdegree Graduate 56,488 Points

Hi Yemaya,

I disagree with Tianni, I didn't feel like I was ready when I got my first job but in hindsight I really was. The chance is that you will never feel entirely ready.

My recommendation would be to start applying for jobs, and to keep learning. Make sure that you have a portfolio containing some of your projects when you start applying for jobs, these are what is going to help you land that job you applied for.

My title is Software Engineer, and my tasks depends on the needs of my team. Some days I get to work on front-end, the next day I might get to work on back-end code. My front-end days include things as SEO, Accessibility and UX, not only the code. And the back-end days often include a lot of decisions on architecture and structure, not only coding.

I hope that helps,

Jonas

Yemaya Re
Yemaya Re
Courses Plus Student 1,922 Points

Thank you! It did help. So as a beginner front end developer, you're saying 'Software Engineer' is an appropriate title to apply for as well? And did you know any back end before you started doing back end coding in your job? And projects... How do you decide what projects to do/work on? Thanks so much for your insight, I really appreciate it.

stjarnan
seal-mask
.a{fill-rule:evenodd;}techdegree seal-36
stjarnan
Front End Web Development Techdegree Graduate 56,488 Points

As a new front-end developer, I would look for jobs asking for the competence that I do have. If you know 60% or so of what they ask in the job post (html, css etc) then you should apply :) When it comes to the title software engineer, I basically wanted you to know what Tianni meant with "way out of the scoops of js and front end" and what the tasks could look like. I would recommend you to focus on what the job posts tells you that the tasks will look like and not only on the titles as they can differ a lot!

If you know front-end that's what you should look for, you can advance later on :)

As for projects, do you have a personal website? That's a great start, make it possible for you to add projects that you create to show them off on your website. Personally I completed the front-end techdegree which gave me a lot of cool projects just like that, I really recommend it. Otherwise, basically every side project you start will teach you something. Just get started on one and try to see it through, that way you will have something to show off to potential employers, and then start another one.

Good luck :)

Jonas

Tianni Myers
Tianni Myers
10,453 Points

Aaahhh so you did agree with me after all. You basically said everything I said but just in a nicer way, I’m very blunt.

stjarnan
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.a{fill-rule:evenodd;}techdegree seal-36
stjarnan
Front End Web Development Techdegree Graduate 56,488 Points

Tianni Myers, what I did not agree on was "If you're asking yourself if your ready then odds are you are probably not." as I asked myself that question myself, and I was more than just ready in the end.

Other than that I really agreed with you, and think you had some great advice :)

Tianni Myers
Tianni Myers
10,453 Points

If you’re asking yourself if your ready then odds are you are probably not. You need some real world projects in your portfolio so you can have something to talk about at a job interview. Software Engineer is way out of the scoops of Js and front end development so don’t worry about it. Honestly, it all depends on what the job market is like where you live. Do some searches on indeed and read entry level job posts in your area. Search for design/web developers on LinkedIn that are near you and see what their experience or portfolio looks like.