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Ruby

Jason Kennell
Jason Kennell
5,724 Points

Build a Todo List with Rails 4

Did I miss a beginning rails course or something? I've spent a lot of time working through the Rails Development Track and finally got to the first course where we actually use Rails. The instructor is just blowing through this stuff like I'm supposed to understand what he's doing and why. Is there a different course I should have started with??

4 Answers

I ended going through the Build a Simple Ruby on Rails Application course sometime after finishing the track and felt that part of the reason for the glossing over of things the Todo list application might be because it wasn't originally supposed to be stand alone, but to be seen after the simple application.

My biggest trouble point would probably be that scaffolding was the first way that was discussed on creating everything instead of using the model, controller, and other generators. I've also read on numerous stackoverflow posts that scaffolding isn't the recommended way to approach things(not sure if its just for the reason that it oversimplifies things to start or if there's another reason for that).

I mostly understood things going through, but when trying to start from scratch on a project of my own and not using scaffolding, I did find myself wondering a bit about how to approach it. The learning from this project so far has been great, but also a lot slower than I am typically used to.

Ryan Field
Ryan Field
Courses Plus Student 21,241 Points

Interesting. I saw that course as well, but I assumed that if it was required (or even beneficial in the slightest), it would be in the "Recommended Courses" section that usually appears at the top of each section. I think I'll give that one a go first, but I'll keep in mind your advice about the scaffolding-first approach. :)

The three sections that helped me out the most(though that could be because I missed them in the todo list program) were the sections on testing, which felt like it went a bit more in depth to the specifics of validations and the designing URLs section, which helped myself a lot with understanding more about routes and giving me at least a foundation in reading the other materials out there, and the Building the Profile Page which went a bit more in depth for myself into the controllers.

This course also does a nice job at showing the distinctions between the front-end and back-end, as well as how they interact.

Most of the rest I saw as another way to do some of the stuff covered elsewhere, I'm not sure if they're outdated or just alternatives.

Ryan Field
Ryan Field
Courses Plus Student 21,241 Points

So, I just started doing the other course you mentioned, and it is leaps and bounds better in terms of helping me understand the whats and whys of Rails. I'm only a few videos in, and I already understand what makes it so powerful and why it would be used. This really should be required (or included) for the RoR track instead of the one that is there now.

I will put this in as fair warning, it is a bit of an older video, so the gems, tools, and some syntax are out of date.

Ryan Field
Ryan Field
Courses Plus Student 21,241 Points

Yeah, I'm seeing that it was from 2012 (and the version of Bootstrap is fairly old), but in terms of explaining what RoR is doing and how it functions, this is so much better, so thanks! I'll keep it in mind to refer to the newer videos and the current documentation if/when I decided to build a RoR application! :)

Adam Rainsby
Adam Rainsby
2,848 Points

You could try the ruby track first if you haven't already

Jason Kennell
Jason Kennell
5,724 Points

The Ruby course is part of the Rails track which I've already completed. Ruby isn't the issue, it's how he's rushing through that Rails app without really explaining what we're doing and why. For example, he's flying through rspec but this is my first exposure to it so I don't understand what he's doing when building these tests and am struggling to keep up. I'm guessing I'm going to have to look outside of Treehouse to get more comfortable with Rails before I continue this track.

agree Jason. Seems like the Ruby section is either outdated for a few of the items and the ones that are there are intermediate. I thought I was in the Ruby track.. guess I was in the Rails track.. will do the Ruby one first.

Ryan Field
PLUS
Ryan Field
Courses Plus Student 21,241 Points

I just went into the Rails Development track and saw I had most of the non-Ruby stuff done, so I thought I'd take a crack at it. I'm pretty good with how programming languages work, so I first did the Ruby Basics section, and had no problems. I also had no problems understanding how to install a Ruby on Rails Development Environment.

Like you say, though, Jason, once he started building the actual app, Jason Seifer really does fly through things without giving much explanation of why he's doing different things. I looked at the Ruby track, but it's mostly just explaining how to do different things in Ruby (like working with objects and whatnot) that I am confident I would have no problems with.

I think the problem is that there really is no explanation beforehand as to why you would develop with Rails, or an overview of the development process. As an example, like Jason mentioned, he immediately dives into "this is how to create an application test," without really explaining that you can create tests or why you would create them in the first place. Another example is when he is creating the scaffold and just types, "title:string description:text" and then magically a few seconds later, he has a complete working HTML form with no explanation of how it got there.

I haven't had any issues understanding Treehouse content so far, but with this one, it really does feel like a section is missing and that the pace is too fast and assumes you already have knowledge about Rails.