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Python Basic Object-Oriented Python Welcome to OOP Adding to our Panda

Adam Del Conte
Adam Del Conte
2,669 Points

Clarifying the {name} and {food} for this ding dang Panda ;p

Y'all, please tell me what I'm doing wrong for step 2 of this problem.

I cannot see the problem.

panda.py
class Panda:
    species = 'Ailuropoda melanoleuca'
    food = 'bamboo'
    name = 'Bao Bao'

    def __init__(self, name, age):
        self.name = name
        self.age = age
        self.is_hungry = True

    def eat(self):
        self.is_hungry = False
        self.name = name
        self.food = food
        return '{} eats {}.'.format(self.name, self.food)

2 Answers

Asher Orr
seal-mask
.a{fill-rule:evenodd;}techdegree seal-36
Asher Orr
Python Development Techdegree Graduate 9,177 Points

Hi Adam! The problem is within your "eat" method.

These 2 lines specifically:

        self.name = name
        self.food = food

Let me show you why:

class Panda:
    species = 'Ailuropoda melanoleuca'
    food = 'bamboo'
    #the above line says: for all instances of the Panda class, the food attribute is 'bamboo'
    name = 'Bao Bao'
    #note: you can delete this line (name= 'Bao Bao'). I'll get into why later.

    def __init__(self, name, age):
        self.is_hungry = True
        self.name = name
        #the above line sets the "name" attribute on any instance of your Panda class to whatever you set it to.
        self.age = age

    def eat(self):
        self.is_hungry = False
        return '{} eats {}.'.format(self.name, self.food)

When you click "Check Work," the checker for this Treehouse challenge is running code like this:

attempt = Panda('Bao Bao', 7)
#this creates the instance of the class.
#the __init__ method wants arguments for the name and age attributes, so they get added here.
attempt.eat()
#now it runs the 'eat' method on this instance of your Panda class, which it named attempt.

Running attempt.eat() will return "Bao Bao eats bamboo."

'Bao Bao' is the name, since the checker passed in the argument 'Bao Bao' for the name attribute. (this is why you can delete line 4.) The name is attribute is supposed to be set when you create an instance- that's why the init method takes name as an argument.

'Bamboo' is the food attribute, because 'bamboo' is the food attribute for ANY instance of the class.

class Panda:
    species = 'Ailuropoda melanoleuca'
    food = 'bamboo'

Your eat method is getting the information about its attributes (self.name, self.age, self.species, etc) from 2 places:

A) The Class attributes

class Panda:
    species = 'Ailuropoda melanoleuca'
    food = 'bamboo'

If an attribute should always be the same, you make it a Class attribute.

B) The dunder init method.

 def __init__(self, name, age):

These are for attributes that might change, depending on the instance. For example:

bao_bao = Panda('Bao Bao', 7)
basi = Panda("Basi", 2)
bobo = Panda("Bobo", 5)

Now, to loop back to your original code:

 def eat(self):
        self.is_hungry = False
        self.name = name
        #Python goes "what?" self.name was defined in the initializer. Now you want it to equal a variable called "name"
        #I don't know what that variable is, so I'm hitting you with a NameError.
        self.food = food
       #Python again goes "what?" self.name is always 'bamboo'. Now you want it to equal a variable called "food"
       #I don't know what that variable is, either.
        return '{} eats {}.'.format(self.name, self.food)

If you remove those 2 lines, your code should pass the challenge. I hope this helps- let me know if you have any questions!

Adam Del Conte
Adam Del Conte
2,669 Points

Thank you so much! Cleared things up perfectly. Now I just have to get through Step 3. Might be back soon with a follow up question 😄

Steven Parker
Steven Parker
221,322 Points

Neither name nor food are defined inside the method "eat". But they don't need to be, since they are both defined when the instance is created, and can be referenced via "self.".