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General Discussion

Ryan Simons
Ryan Simons
4,568 Points

Code Memorization?

As you guys can see I have about 4k points on here but I simply can't remember all the syntax I've learned how do you guys do it ? study aids? copy & paste ? tips?

6 Answers

Drew S
Drew S
34,034 Points

Ryan,

I have quadruple the amount of points as you and I still can't remember all of the syntax.

The most important thing is get the concept of what the code is doing.

Don't get discouraged when you can't remember the syntax. It's alright to look it up.

It gets easier and easier the more you practice using the code.

Hope that helps.

Edit: also, when I start learning a new programming language I'll look up cheat sheets of the syntax and print them off. I'll keep them on my desk and look at them throughout the day which helps remember the syntax.

Eddie Flores
Eddie Flores
9,110 Points

Not everyone will remember everything. All I can say is to practice. Luckily the majority of languages use similar syntax so that when you write code is a bit relative to something else. The only issue is repetition, and many hours of it.

For example I dove in head first into the Ruby tutorials. I was not sure what to expect and I have never had any exposure to it. I had may issues along the way and I probably put in a good 30-40 hours into just going through the tutorial and learning the reasons as to why I was getting certain errors (outdated versions) and learning on ways to control that. With time I was able to pick up the ruby language to the point when I took the Ruby Foundations Deep Dive I soared right through it.

Same goes for the Objective-C stuff, and the Javascript. It takes time and practice. No other choice. If not you will be relegated to constantly be looking things up. While learning you will do that over and over... and eventually you will just know what to do next.

Good Luck.

Kevin Korte
Kevin Korte
28,135 Points

You don't memorize the code, you memorize the spots to remind you. For instance I have from memory https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/ on speed dial. Other sites I use often too like CSS-Tricks.com to refresh my memory of proper syntax.

James Barnett
James Barnett
39,199 Points
  • Take careful notes while watching the videos
  • Makes your cheat sheet using something like workflowly keep it in your bookmark bar
  • Remember you don't have to memorize everything, it's important to know what you don't know and where to look up the syntax

> As you guys can see I have about 4k points on here but I simply can't remember all the syntax

You've yet to do 500 points worth of programming in any single language. I think the most important thing for you to remember the syntax to use it, so I'd say you should pick a track and stick with it for a few months. Create demos and make your own practice exercises.

You need to experiment with the code. I learned JS probably 2 or 3 years ago and I still remember it extremely well... That's because at the time, Codecademy had come out with some really intense projects/exercises with the original JS track. Since then, they've released a 'kinder, gentler' version. They have a somewhat intense Python course too and I remember Python syntax fairly well.

Go on CodeEval.com and work on those projects to gain points. Try to work them in the languages you're really serious about learning. The more problems you do and the more complex they get, the more you'll learn. The more problems you pass, the more confidence you build and the more comfortable you'll feel coding whichever language it is you want to master.

Ryan Simons
Ryan Simons
4,568 Points

Do you guys jot down lines of code from each language for example to help you differentiate languages?

All of the time. I use Evernote for that.

James Barnett
James Barnett
39,199 Points

I use Workflowy for that. I'm a bit of a Workflowy addict. Since workflowy is web-based, I'm never without my notes, and I keep a link in my bookmark bar so I can get to my notes in one click.