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General Discussion

kush sharma
PLUS
kush sharma
Courses Plus Student 2,360 Points

Coding skills- talent and hard work

Hi guys, These are few questions which pop in my mind time and again, This whole coding thing , is it reserved for some special few who are born with some inborn talent with mad coding skills, like mark zuckerberg who created facebook all on his own..? I mean if we are learning something we aim to become the best in the field but no matter how hard i work can i come at the same level with those guys..? If no then is it worth it to learn any language..or anything as such...?

Would be great to hear your views.

5 Answers

Hi Kush,

I think it is bad practice to think like that. There will always be coders who are more skilful than yourself. You are just a fish in the sea! But even though only one person can be the 'best' coder, that doesn't mean it isn't worth it for the rest of us!

That is like saying "If I can't have the 'best' life than life is not worth it at all."

It is about what we take away from it as individuals. And more importantly, what we can give it!

Mark Zuckerberg gave us Facebook. I wonder what Kush Sharma can give us? :)

Regards, Jordan.

Not to mention that even though the Facebook we know today is a marvellous feat of engineering and scaling, it's a result of work done by thousands of programmers. The original Facebook, the one Mark Zuckerberg wrote on his own, was only a moderately complex application (compared to most web apps of that time).

What made it the success that it is was not his programming prowess or the complexity of the app, but rather the idea behind the app itself.

You don't need to be a programmer at all to have a good idea. :)

The programming part needn't be elegant and masterful, sometimes it's enough just to get the product out there. Once people start using it and it proves itself useful and profitable (or at least profitable :) ), it's not that much of a problem to improve on the existing codebase.

Holger Liesegang
Holger Liesegang
50,595 Points

Hi Kush,

how about another point of view? Do you really love programming? - because that's what lets you program (or do any other thing like playing a music instrument) for hours - forgetting everything around you (being "in the state of flow" so to speak), not even noticing the slightest feeling of exhaustion that normally gets to you after so many hours of "work"...

I wrote my first program at age 9 on a Sinclair(Timex) ZX-81 (with the luxurious 16KB extension of course) because I was so completely fascinated by the idea of a machine doing something automatically...

You have to love what you do - at least to be perfect and that's what you where hinting at. If you really do, learning doesn't feel like learning but like fun.

Of course there are always those topics need to know and not so fun to learn (I personally do have some of these too, of course :-) ) but the team at Treehouse does the best job possible for you to study even those topics with ease - and trust me on this as I learned and taught already a lot programming stuff in my live. Android Development has been one of those unpopularly topics for me but as the market of Android devices unfortunately isn't going to shrink any time soon you have to be capable of programming for this system (...at least that's what i told myself). I'd like to quote Ben Jakuben on that matter telling Sam Soffes "Now you can have an informed distaste of it" on twitter. Well that's exactly what I'm starting to feel now working with Android Studio - oh, and btw I do really love this quote Ben Jakuben :-)

But maybe (who knows) I'm going to even like (less dislike) Android by the end of the Track :)

Thats really much to read (never wrote a longer post than this in the forum so far) - so here's my "punchline":

You want to "come at the same level with those guys" you have to love what you do on the very same level and with the very same intensity.

Just my 2c Kind Regards Holger

Ben Jakuben
Ben Jakuben
Treehouse Teacher

LOL I'm a little worried that an "informed distaste" of Android development is becoming a thing...

kush sharma
PLUS
kush sharma
Courses Plus Student 2,360 Points

Hey thanks guys for your thoughts...much appreciated..:)...#inspired #motivated..

James Barnett
James Barnett
39,199 Points

There's a lot of "coding" that's outside of traditional computer science.

A lot of frontend work falls into that category. Not to say there isn't hardcore frontend JavaScript but it's a much smaller percentage of JavaScript code written.

So in conclusion there's totally a place in building the web for people who aren't particularly gifted in computer science.

Ben Jakuben
STAFF
Ben Jakuben
Treehouse Teacher

This is a great question. I'll just agree with everything said here and add my own experience:

It just takes time and practice. That time and practice go by so much faster and easier if you enjoy it, even a little bit. I gave up programming when I first started because I didn't like my first class in college and wanted to try other things. But I always liked learning how computers worked, and when I came back to programming I found I learned a lot more the 2nd time through my first book and then really started to enjoy it once I started to understand it.

In my career I've always been impressed by senior developers while also feeling a little dismayed that I might never be that good. But lots of people say all the right buzz words without really knowing what they're doing. Also, everyone who is a good programmer has spent a lot of time getting that way.

It's not an innate talent; it's just a different way of thinking. As soon as you start training your brain to think that way then it starts to make more and more sense.

Hope you get a lot out of it!