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HTML

Dreamweaver Replacement

What is so good about dreamweaver and are there any replacements for that don't cost as much. I am using Sublime Text 2 as of right now. Why should I switch to dreamweaver or another software?

4 Answers

Kevin Korte
Kevin Korte
28,135 Points

I don't think that I necessary would switch. I have CS6 at work, and CS5 at home I got through my school. The program itself is fine, and it it's kinda nice the layout and menus are similar to Illustrator, Fireworks, and Photoshop so it is intuitive to stay within the suite of programs.

However, dreamweaver has a ton of fluff to it. Fluff that I do not ever use. It can help you build forms and validations, but I really would not use those, personally I dont. I hard code that. It has design view, which again I never use, I use a web browser and my localhost server.

I wouldn't personally pay for the premium price for dreamweaver, if I didn't already have it. Some of the features I really like like error detection, telling you what that random closing div is actually closing (if it is), what styles or info are attached to html markup, and suggestion code completion can usually be found on other software.

Just me .02. I like it enough to use it, but wouldn't pay for it personally.

Is there any software that helps create grids and layouts?

Kevin Korte
Kevin Korte
28,135 Points

I would never rely on a software program for that. However, there are many fantastic frameworks to help you out there.

My personal favorite is twitter bootstrap.

Some other well known tools you could use could be zurb and gridulator

Really, you could just google CSS frameworks, bootstrap has never let me down. But what you want is something completely separate than the coding software you are using.

I've seen people use photoshop and place grids in there and design websites. Do you know if twitter bootstrap is capable of doing that? Maybe even pixelmator since that is what I use?

While I agree with Kevin about using bootstrap or foundation for grids and layout. I would recommend you sticking with Sublime Text 2. It has everything you need as far as an editor goes and relying on dreamweaver would be more of a handicap than an asset at this point.

Here's a great video series that will teach you everything you need to know about sublime text 2 that will dramatically improve your workflow.

https://tutsplus.com/course/improve-workflow-in-sublime-text-2/

Thanks for the help Brian!

Kevin Korte
Kevin Korte
28,135 Points

Brian Story I agree with you too that I would just stick with Sublime Text 2. My point to make was I use Dreamweaver because it was what was basically "given" to me, and works fine as in editor, but the fluff of menu options are not necessary for someone trying to learn to code. My ultimate answer is I wouldn't buy Dreamweaver out of my personal pocket, I'd go with ST2.

There are many places (including where I work) that will laugh at the guys that list dreamweaver on their resume. We want guys that know how to write without use of a wysiwyg.

Personally I do my front-end stuff in notepad++ (http://notepad-plus-plus.org/). It allows for a ton of customization as well. I've only recently tried sublime text and liked it; however since I've customized notepad++ so much I stick to it because I'm quicker with it still. I'm sure if I started out with sublime text I'd be using it instead.

I think you should use whatever tool allows you to work best and quickest as long as it doesn't bastardize or change your code. If you use one of the plain text editors you'll find that you'll learn stuff quicker.