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General Discussion

Has anyone gotten a job after completing one of the tracks?

Has anyone actually gotten a job and could share their experience after completing a specific "Track"? I'm curious because I'm Completely reinventing a career do to a permanent injury, but the amount of knowledge they claim to give you required for each track, never seems to be enough. I'd like to be a backend developer, but I can't seem to get everything in one place. It's sort of confusing

7 Answers

Joe Consterdine
Joe Consterdine
13,965 Points

Hi Byron,

It took me 10 months with no degree to land a job as a front-end developer.

Having said that, I spent everyday of that 10 months and on a lot of days spent 3-4 hours learning.

If you want it badly enough then you'll make it happen.

Good luck!

Julian Antoine
Julian Antoine
420 Points

I'm currently on the same exact path. I plan on going for my first job in two years maybe.

Garrett Levine
Garrett Levine
20,305 Points

Hey Byron,

I am currently teaching myself as much as I can through various tree house tracks. I am actually very qualified for jobs right now, but lack the confidence to go out and get a job. I am attending a coding bootcamp to bolster my credentials, as well as filling in the gaps with more treehouse education.

If you ever want to talk more feel free to contact me!

Good luck!

Hey Byron,

Completing a specific track isn't necessarily going to get you hired. The Front End Web Development track, for example, is only a stepping stone for someone looking to be a Front End Developer. You need to be able to take what you learn from the provided courses and build upon that knowledge with regular practice. Most importantly, you should also design, develop and maintain a portfolio demonstrating your abilities.

Depending on what you're interested in career wise, you may also consider posting on sites such as Dribbble or CodePen to establish a presence in your desired community. This can lead to connections, which in turn can lead to job offers.

As with Joe, it took me roughly ten months to obtain my current position. Although I have a degree and am working on a second, Treehouse is a crucial tool that I continuously use to aid me in the classroom and at work.

A note on university studies: You'll be amazed by how much college does not prepare you for real-world working environments. This is mainly due to the rapid change in technology. For example, I paid thousands of dollars for a website 101 course only to find the professor teaching outdated HTML, CSS, and JavaScript principles.

AFIR MOURAD TAHAR
AFIR MOURAD TAHAR
3,766 Points

Joe,

I don't know any alternative other than the path you went through. Perseverance. patience. digging vertically deep inside algorithms.

Thank you for sharing your experience.

Amy Kang
Amy Kang
17,188 Points

I self-studied through various sources including Treehouse for about a year then attended a coding bootcamp. Afterwards, I lucked into a full-stack developer role.

Finishing one track probably won't be enough to land you a job.

If you want to be a back-end developer, you need to be great at Data Structures and Algorithms. Split your time between learning a server side framework and practicing algorithms. Learn about Binary Trees, Linked LIsts, Hash Tables, Stacks, Queues, Big O Notation, etc.

It's very hard to get hired if you're not comfortable writing algorithms. Most places won't look at your portfolio until you've proven your ability in their interview process. I wish someone told me this when I was starting.

Joe Consterdine
Joe Consterdine
13,965 Points

I'm not sure Amy, I think it just depends on the employer. In my experience anyway the employer was more concerned on my eagerness to learn rather than my ability.

Sure I had a small coding test but it wasn't very difficult and I actually didn't do that good of a job and still got it!

Amy Kang
Amy Kang
17,188 Points

I'm not sure about front-end developer interviews but for full-stack/back-end developers you're very likely to be given a technical phone screen, then a whiteboard interview onsite. I'm just going by my own experience and those of my classmates. Data Structures and algorithms are common questions for back-end developers.

But you're right it depends on the employer, some places don't care that much. My advice is directed towards someone who wants to get into back-end development.

I know I'm late to the party here, but I wanted to ask you Joe was your role entry level or more advance and to clarify, you never had any education beyond Treehouse?

Joe Consterdine
Joe Consterdine
13,965 Points

Yeah fair enough, I wouldn't know for back-end positions.

I think at the end of the day the greatest aspect of learning code is you can start from zero and catch people up very quickly as you have 24 hours to improve your skills.