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General Discussion

Nicholas Olsen
Nicholas Olsen
1,698 Points

How did you know which programming language was for you? Was it boring at first?

I am very much into programming, and I started off at a community college. Unfortunately, the professors didn't seem geared toward learning, and made the effort of working towards passing suppress the excitement of programming. I am thankful for the help of treehouse, and I am going through the Java course, but the spark for Java just doesn't seem to be there anymore. My dream is to be a programmer, and make a difference in the world somehow. Like anyone, it would be to support myself in the future but I also enjoy creating, designing, and helping others. Computers are my passion, and I am ready to dedicate myself full time since I graduated a week ago, but I want to make sure I choose the right language. When did you get that "Ah-ha" moment when learning, what struggles did you have? I appreciate if you take the time to answer my question, and thank you for your advice and wisdom. Happy coding! ~ Nick Olsen

Simon Coates
Simon Coates
28,693 Points

you may want to take a look at quora. People might have asked similar questions.

5 Answers

jason chan
jason chan
31,008 Points

try switching to php or javascript or even python. Those languages are more fun. Then again learn whatever language is near your home for job. So go on the jobs boards and look for what employers are hiring for. Then again you can work remotely, but you have to be very organized.

Nicholas Olsen
Nicholas Olsen
1,698 Points

I definitely want to try other languages, and see if there are others I enjoy more. I don't want to define myself by one language, and that may be where I am going wrong. Thank you so much for your advice! I greatly appreciate it! Happy coding! ~Nick

Ethan Rivas
Ethan Rivas
9,979 Points

Well, for me I started with the basics, HTML & CSS (they arent 100% programming languages), after that, javascript, and ruby (with ruby on rails) and other programming languages, but I found that I was having a problem, I could not solve some problems because my knowledge was limited into the sintax, loops and some data structures and I wasn't ready for the real programming world.

So a good friend of me teachs me the basic concepts, and now I can deal with them, of course they're a lot of other kind of problems out there but now I cand deal with them or think a little bit more how solve them.

If you don't like the theory of your collage and you want to jump into the programming world you can do it but unfortunely you have to learn it, it's very, very needed all the theory and after that, all the programming languages are a piece of cake :p.

I'm not telling you that i'm the next gates or jobs but, I know how handle some stuffs.

Good luck with this and sorry for my horrible English /o/

Nicholas Olsen
Nicholas Olsen
1,698 Points

Sometimes I do find it hard also to solve problems, and it may be that my knowledge of syntax is useless without knowing how to actually piece everything together. You gave me some great advice and I am going to do the best I can to apply it all! Thank you so much, ~ Nick

Simon Coates
Simon Coates
28,693 Points

It's a question of schools of thought. Some people are all about loving their jobs, whereas other people might like the paycheck that comes with java. Within an IT job, it's not just about loving the language, your motivations are plural: liking the language, being embedded in the company culture, incentives, rewards, enjoying the social aspect. SOme people love their work and that's all they need. Other people when learning may be well served to have a social network of like minded people to interact with, and engage in a discussion with themselves who they are, what they want, and creating plans and goals about getting there etc. Apply technique to put learning in a context of structures to motivate you. You might want to review some videos on grit by angela duckworth, or on will https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NzVoQkPswRk. People tend to their will, their motivation. I'm not suggesting you accept not enjoying the technology you use, and i'd note that some people find java a little slow and dull. PHP or something front end might help if you want to get something out fast (pretty satisfying). But a lot of us have to apply technique to keep enthusiasm up, including taking a break and getting enjoyment in various aspects of life (friends, relationships, exercise, structures of meaning). I don't think a momentary lapse in passion should be a dealbreaker. (i don't know what i'm talking about. get other opinions.)

Nicholas Olsen
Nicholas Olsen
1,698 Points

Thank you so much for your thoughtful response. That video you linked is encouraging, and I intend to apply its advice and keep my will power strong, and not to let it diminish. Part of figuring out what to do may take time, heck, I have only been doing this for a week, I'm just making sure to take the right steps. I need to try other languages, and I will, so that I can truly see what works best for me. I definitely plan on enjoying other aspects of my life while I am young, but I also want to secure my future while I can. And if I can make my dreams regarding programming come true, then there is nothing that can get in my way! Your response was more than I expected, but everything I hoped to hear. Happy coding, ~ Nick

I felt the same way about JavaScript. I forced myself to learn the language because most jobs here required some experience with it so it was more like a chore. After a few lessons and the full-stack JavaScript track here at Treehouse and YouTube videos, things started to click but no "ah-ha" moment. So, I started creating small projects rather then following tutorials online and after a few projects I grew a love for JavaScript and now I can't get enough of it.

I think my advice to you would be, reflect on why you first selected Java and whether you no longer feel the "spark" is because you don't understand everything or if the language really isn't for you.

I recommend learning JavaScript as it is quickly becoming the most popular language.

Nicholas Olsen
Nicholas Olsen
1,698 Points

The "Ah-ha" moment is something that seems to be rare. I have had areas of a language click, for instance, certain aspects of C++ really made sense to me and fueled my creativity in the language. But further concepts slowly diminished that spark, could have also been it was an online community college course. I don't feel that anything is impossible for me to learn and I understand it will take time, however it was a good point that you brought out in reflecting on what first drew me to the language. It was a couple years ago so I will have to ponder that thought, and I appreciate your help. Thank you for your extended response and for sharing your personal experience! Happy coding, ~ Nick

jason chan
jason chan
31,008 Points

Plus 1 on javascript. java is great for backend and andriod though. Learning other languages will help you see different perspective plus all the teachers here at team treehouse teach a different way. I found random good concepts from all the different courses I've taken here.