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Ivana Lescesen
Ivana Lescesen
19,442 Points

How do you motivate yourself? Thank you :)

Hi john larson Jennifer Nordell Steven Parker hope you are well. I really love coding and really enjoy it, but I sometimes find myself overwhelmed by so much new information. How do you prevent yourself from burning out and how do suggest to motivate yourself to learn when you are stuck.

Thank you so much :)

9 Answers

Jennifer Nordell
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STAFF
.a{fill-rule:evenodd;}techdegree
Jennifer Nordell
Treehouse Teacher

I do get burnt out! And then I get over it. I realize what I want to do. But more than that, I realize that I want to be more than I am. I want to contribute, and this is what I love. So this is my best shot to make a difference somehow, I think.

And I'm in agreement with Kristian Gausel. Remember a while back, I said that what I love about your questions is that they tend to be these big idea/concept questions? There's a reason for that. Because once you get the idea behind why or how we do something, these are transferable to other languages. A loop is a loop. Truthy is truthy and falsey is falsey. And these sort of things may be written differently in other languages, but the idea is the same. It's only the very small details about how we write it that changes. Some languages love semicolons. Others don't. Once you start moving into other languages, you'll realize just how much like refresher courses they feel if you have understood the concept behind them.

And Simon Coates is also correct. There will come a time when you learn something without realizing you've learned it. You may be walking through a step right now and it might feel strange and foreign. But after doing this same thing in a myriad of ways, it somehow morphs from being an obscure idea into something that now feels completely obvious. The same thing was probably true when you were small and learning addition for the first time. Now you don't think twice about it. It just makes sense.

When I get stuck, and I feel like nothing is working for me and maybe nothing will ever work for me I try and stop for a day or so and just realize how far I've come. And then I get a little mad at myself and remind myself how hard I've already worked! Why stop now? Because the only one standing in my way... is me.

Hope this helps! :sparkles:

Kristian Gausel
Kristian Gausel
14,649 Points

It is important to love what you are doing. Also the amount of "new" information diminishes once you have grasped the concept of programming. The programming language becomes unimportant, and it becomes more fun to just try the new technologies out there.

It is a lot easier to stay motivated once you're past the steep learning curve of programming.

Good luck

Simon Coates
Simon Coates
28,692 Points

Have to agree. There are some concept or paradigms that take a while to get your head around. you may not get them immediately, but you don't have necessarily have to. At some point, your brains rewires and something that seemed a massive leap is trivial. It's important for motivation to know that that initial confusion and frustration can often fade, and then you find yourself looking back at a skill you picked up, uncertain when it went from being incomprehensible. At some point, you'll likely be surprised and heartened by how much you've picked up. And (per Kristian's point) a lot of the different areas of IT are ultimately versions of the same tasks, often meaning that you don't require the same conceptual leaps that you did to begin with.

Steven Parker
Steven Parker
216,151 Points

I agree with the suggestion Jennifer Nordell made about taking a break. Either take a break entirely, or spend some time experimenting with the things you recently learned, depending on how you feel. But take a break from cramming new stuff into your head. "Only eat when you're hungry". :smiley:

And Jennifer, congrats on passing 40,000 points (and 400 badges). :mortar_board: And in less than 6 months — you're certainly making the most of your subscription!

Jennifer Nordell
seal-mask
.a{fill-rule:evenodd;}techdegree
Jennifer Nordell
Treehouse Teacher

Steven Parker I'll be happy when I know a quarter of what you do :smiley: Yup, I wanted to make the 40k mark before 6 months. And yes, I've tried to make my time here count! :sparkles:

Ivana Lescesen I totally understand where you are coming from. When I first started learning programming I came across this blog post that really help put things into perspective for me. Take a read and I hope it helps:

why is learning to code so damn hard

Jacob, that is an awesome blog, thank you.

John, I'm glad you enjoyed it.

Simon Coates
Simon Coates
28,692 Points

some people do actually just love the work (or have convinced themselves they do), and that may affect the kind of answer you get. A lot of people have to have try and create systems to keep us engaged (to include work, rest, recharging the batteries), and work on our motivations. I watch online videos to try and keep my mind focused (angela duckworth on grit, kelly mcgonigal on will, other videos on things like locus of control, goals) and correct my extreme nihilistic and pessimistic tendencies. But I just want to say, it's not just you. All of us have netflix account that are way more interesting than learning swift. Its easy to see the people who are super keen, and get a faulty impression of what people have to do to get through self improvement. I have to regularly refocus on the avenues of life that are opened to me by my shiny hypothetical future. I also find that i'm most driven when i deal with driven people with similar goals. If you can get your social environment to bind you into your course of action, i think that might help.

(my 2 cents worth, though my name is not steven, jennifer, or john).

It gets overwhelming sometimes. I agree with everyone. Most people in the forums are very encouraging. So that's where I come. Also, for me when I feel like my brain is going to pop, I try working on a project that's more on the creative visual side. Like a new website, and practice all the css stuff I forgot cause I got so wrapped up in the programming part.

Aaron Coursolle
Aaron Coursolle
18,014 Points

While you may not be writing a book, authors have to organize their time in a similar manner. In fact they have more similarities than someone who works as a CEO or a regular office job (most books on time management seem to address only these people). So read a good book on the writing process and creativity and adjust your tasks accordingly.

Ivana Lescesen
Ivana Lescesen
19,442 Points

You are all so awesome thank you :)