Welcome to the Treehouse Community

The Treehouse Community is a meeting place for developers, designers, and programmers of all backgrounds and skill levels to get support. Collaborate here on code errors or bugs that you need feedback on, or asking for an extra set of eyes on your latest project. Join thousands of Treehouse students and alumni in the community today. (Note: Only Treehouse students can comment or ask questions, but non-students are welcome to browse our conversations.)

Looking to learn something new?

Treehouse offers a seven day free trial for new students. Get access to thousands of hours of content and a supportive community. Start your free trial today.

CSS CSS Selectors Advanced Selectors The attr() CSS Function

Li Mbo
Li Mbo
5,096 Points

In real life, does a web developer remember all those selectors?

In other words, to be a good web designer/developer, do we really need to become a CSS ninja?

I am overwhelmed by how many selectors there are and how many possible options could be implemented! I hope I am not the only the only one ;D.

Rifqi Fahmi
Rifqi Fahmi
23,164 Points

i'm with you bruh :'). I am even learning javascript and php simultaneously which are trickier :'(

5 Answers

Bradley Martin
Bradley Martin
10,581 Points

Very good question Amir. I don't think you do, however the more you work at it, the more all of this stuff starts to stick in your mind. What I've found is that over time, I've developed a trusted base set of stuff that I call upon in every project and the majority of that I can just roll out without consulting elsewhere.

Then there's a whole load of classes and selectors that one rarely uses unless a specific scenario crops up. But one will think, 'ah – that needs this sort of treatment' – where I know broadly how to achieve it, but have to refer elsewhere to get the code and notation pinned down.

Ultimately, as you practice your chosen code (be it CSS or some other language), bits and pieces will slowly seep into your blood and subconscious.

Don't worry – we all go through this. As long as you have passion for what you are doing, you'll naturally develop a thirst and curiosity for the nuances of the code and through that, you'll begin to intuitively know what's required on any given issue. The web community is out there to help you achieve those goals while you're growing your skills.

Good luck and keep coding! :-)

Greg Kaleka
Greg Kaleka
39,019 Points

Well said.

Part of what can make coding frustrating early on is the need to look up every damn thing as you trudge through a project. That becomes less and less problematic as you a) start remembering more and more, and b) become better at quickly finding what you're looking for.

Greg Kaleka
Greg Kaleka
39,019 Points

Like all programming languages, nobody knows all of CSS by heart :). Everyone uses the documentation, including professionals with decades of experience. You'll start to develop a repertoire of ones you remember down pat and ones you sort of remember, but need to look up specific spelling, etc. Those lists will grow over time, but you'll always need to have the documentation in your figurative back pocket :)

I agree. Part of being an "expert" is knowing where to go for the answers :)

jamesscott
jamesscott
4,432 Points

I've been struggling with the very same thing: To develop an intuitive sense of what it is I am actually looking at that needs to be addressed and how to go about finding that information, if it doesn't register immediately.

I'm curious to know how newbies go about finding work? Anyone have any suggestions? Finding entry level jobs that require basic HTML/CSS grunt work to be done? I'm already getting some local work revamping websites for folks that I know in order to develop a portfolio.

Christopher Mlalazi
seal-mask
.a{fill-rule:evenodd;}techdegree seal-36
Christopher Mlalazi
Front End Web Development Techdegree Graduate 17,305 Points

Good question, it was bothering me too, as after studying code, when I go to sleep I find myself worrying about the contents of a lesson and whether I can be able to remember the tags without consulting the video, but as the more experienced guys are saying, we just need time to let some of this seep in.