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General Discussion

Donghyeok Yun
Donghyeok Yun
4,514 Points

Is ES2015 the new Javascript?

So, is ES2015 or ES6 the new version of javascript. Is that mean that I should more focus on ES2015 than other javascript courses? Also, is ES2015 going to be more dominant and most widely used javascript in the future?

2 Answers

Erik Nuber
Erik Nuber
20,629 Points

Yes, ES2015 isn’t introducing anything other than improvements to the JavaScript language and a few new features.

https://themeteorchef.com/blog/what-is-es2015/

Donghyeok Yun
Donghyeok Yun
4,514 Points

why is it to me that ES2015 looks bit more complicated than javascript. So like.....

This one is javascript

var braveNewWorld = function( world ) { console.log( "Welcome to" + world ); };

This one is ES2015

var braveNewWorld = ( world ) => { console.log( "Welcome to" + world ); };

I personally would be more confused by ES2015 more, because it uses => as function and I think it would be more easier to understand as a word. Rather than a symbol.

Erik Nuber
Erik Nuber
20,629 Points

That I can't help you with. Haven't read up on watched anything on it. Hopefully someone else will come along and be able to answer your question.

Ken Howard
STAFF
Ken Howard
Treehouse Guest Teacher

Thew new syntax for functions doesn't replace the existing syntax. The new syntax, called arrow function, doesn't have a scope (inherits outer-scope's "this" keyword).

While you can continue to write in ES5, it would be good to learn these new features too.