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HTML Accessibility Websites HTML: Part 1

Is using an unordered list really still the most accessible way to create navigation?

Nowadays we have nav, so I'm wondering if this still holds true.

4 Answers

Kevin Korte
Kevin Korte
28,135 Points

It still is a solid option. At the end of the day, a navigation is a list of links or options, so it holds true that the HTML accurately describes what it is, in the even that CSS styles did not load. The release of HTML5 brought us a new option, known as the <nav> tag, which can also be used. Just be aware of any possible issues supporting legacy browsers as older browsers do not understand HTML5 tags. There are plenty of articles on the internet that will explain how to deal with this.

Cale Matteson
Cale Matteson
11,303 Points

Hello!

I just thought I'd add my two cents. Flexbox is new and it is gaining support in the modern browsers. I have been using them as footers in most my recent projects and they work like a charm. Very easy to control. In terms of accessibility though, I really have no idea hows its treated. Something to research I guess!

Cale

Kevin Korte
Kevin Korte
28,135 Points

I kinda fixed it, he was referring to the nav element.

I must say, based on HTML mappings to accessibility APIs, nav should be preferred. Unlike a generic list, standards assign nav the WAI-ARIA role navigation, a landmark role. Assistive technologies prioritize landmarks for quick access to the user. Landmark commands allow users to immediately access navigation without flailing around.

Jan Lundeen
Jan Lundeen
5,781 Points

I had the same question as robinberghuijs. It seems like there's a difference of opinion. I'm still a little confused why an unordered list would be more accessible. Is this because it's easier for a screen reader to read an unordered list? Or is it easier for a screen reader to find a landmark role(nav creates a landmark - see Luis' post)? I would think that they would have guidelines (like the WAI-ARIA, which wwould spell out what is considered more accessible), but I'm new to accessibility, so I'm not sure. Or is this just a matter of opinion?