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General Discussion

Peter Smith
Peter Smith
12,347 Points

Job Search Tip?

Hey,

I have done the Front-End Web Dev Track, applied it's teachings to two projects, my portfolio and reddit+16personalities.

I'm now pushing to do this work professionally and get hired as a front-end web dev. I have some anxiety about how to e-mail employers who are looking for web devs. My fingers want to just start typing e-mails to every employer I can find and start applying. But my head wants to pause, breathe, and develop a strategy and story for why I should be hired, etc...

What do you all think? Are my fingers right? Should I just start sending e-mails? Or is it my head I should listen to, and be a bit strategic?

2 Answers

I think it behooves you to be strategic and think hard about the companies to which you might apply. I know we don't always have the luxury to be choosy about employment, but if you are able, you should consider filtering the companies based on how excited you are about the work they do, how other employees report feeling about working there, and how the company's culture fits with your goals and temperament.

If you aren't already doing so, I recommend going to as many meetups and tech events as possible and start making friendly connections with other people who are working on interesting projects. A lot of jobs can be found just by networking, and in my experience, if you are doing it right, networking doesn't feel like anything more than developing relationships with interesting people who share your passions and interests. These kinds of relationships can engender job leads, project partners, and inside information about the companies in your area. Plus, it's fun to meet likeminded people.

Peter Smith
Peter Smith
12,347 Points

Tree Casiano great tips!

I'm in Syracuse, NY. It's a mid-sized city, has a nice little tech scene, but I don't know where to get started since I just got here. I'm looking for meetups, looking for hackathons, startupweekends, and the like. I found a nice list of tech companies in the area though.

I don't know anything about Syracuse, but I don't think you will have too much trouble connecting with the tech community there.

NextPlex

Tech growth with community awareness: Syracuse, N.Y.

If the events and meetups in Syracuse are like the ones I've been attending in Portland, you'll be able to get some great job hunting tips and leads from others who attend the events. One of my favorite things about getting into the tech world is how welcoming other developers seem to be (at least that's been the case here in Portland).

Good luck with the job search!

Peter Smith
Peter Smith
12,347 Points

Great!

Those links are already helpful! Got myself signed up for an upcoming hackathon!

Mark VonGyer
Mark VonGyer
21,214 Points

Hi Peter. I can hopefully help with this being a former developer recruiter!

If you send emails out to IT companies they will need to be straight to the point and show what you can provide the company. This is hard to do in an email without knowing what they are currently looking for, and you could end up writing a wall of text. These can be ignored alot of the time, especially when going into generic email boxes.

As Tree Casiano has mentioned,networking events are great! There can be all sorts of tech meetups happening around your local area.

I would also try personal contacts you may have in the industry, maybe somebody knows someone who you can bounce off?

Thirdly, I recommend picking up the phone and calling in to the company you want to apply for; find out if they are open to taking someone new on, what they are looking for and who will make the decision. If you have this information it is alot easier to to make an effective application and ensure the highest chances it will be read.

Also respond to adverts, and perhaps talk to a few recruiters in your area - they may have some great opportunities they can ssend your application in for.

Peter Smith
Peter Smith
12,347 Points

Great tips Mark! Especially

I recommend picking up the phone and calling in to the company you want to apply for; find out if they are open to taking someone new on, what they are looking for and who will make the decision. If you have this information it is alot easier to to make an effective application and ensure the highest chances it will be read.

I'll definitely be using these tips!