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HTML

Joseph Torres
Joseph Torres
6,165 Points

Just want to advice and input before I move on in the Front Dev Track!!

I just recently finished the "How to make a Website, HTML Video & Audio, and HTML Table lessons. I feel that I should build a webpage or site just to practice what I've learned however Im not sure if I should continue onto the next step in the track. Who's in my shoes and what points did you hit if you decided to to build something before continuing. Thank you so much, this has been an amazing journey.

Loek Weijts
Loek Weijts
6,159 Points

Hi, i use this approach: Everyday i open just a random website, what i like and start 'copy' the whole page just for practice. Works very well, at least for me. I just build the framework, (+ responsive) in colorblocks. (With exception of <ul><li> menu's.)

3 Answers

I believe creating a small project or simple site for practice would be a great idea for you at this point. Practicing what you've learned in the videos on multiple occasions will help make the concepts stick more and will be more helpful for you as you continue through the course. Maybe re design you "How to Build a Website" site for you or redesign it or even take your favorite show or tv character and build a simple site around them using all the concepts used learned so far.

Joseph Torres
Joseph Torres
6,165 Points

Hello Jonathon, thank you for your input. That's exactly what I was thinking and thank you for confirming that. Im gonna be taking a MCSD course (Microsoft Developers coarse) soon and wanted to brush up on my skills. Thank you once again.

I'll second what Jonathan Tyler is saying here and add that until you actually start building something, you're only doing tutorials. Sure, there's nothing wrong with that. It's a great way to familiarize yourself with the languages involved, the processes. guidelines, and so on, but if you don't stretch beyond the comfort of "following" you'll never "do" anything with what you learn. What's worse is, what you learn in these courses is only a small bit of what you'll learn by doing it yourself beyond the courses. I would take your favorite course from here, or find a tutorial somewhere else that gets you a basic website that feels about like you had as you did the lessons here, then take it and make it your own. Experiment with it, change it up, then as you continue your learning process, break it apart and put it back together with your newfound knowledge. As you keep doing this, eventually you come up with a website that you're comfortable with and that grows alongside you. Even if you only self-host using a local server, it's worth playing around with. I'll offer a bit of advice though: If you haven't messed with version control yet, do. Heck, take the GitHub courses here before you take the next step in the track. Even if you don't use GitHub and just use git (or something else) on your local machine, you'll thank yourself later. Between the various frameworks that use git, the mistakes you'll make that will cripple a site after hours/days of work, the ease of use for templating basic stuff, and all the experimenting that you will probably wind up doing, the sooner you get into version control, the more time you'll have to get used to it and the more time you'll save yourself later down the line.

Joseph Torres
Joseph Torres
6,165 Points

That's great advice, thank you so much. I do have a few good ideas for a website. In regards to Git or Github, I did notice that being a requirement to know in job offers. Thank you so much for the great advice.