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JavaScript AJAX Basics (retiring) AJAX Concepts Introducing AJAX

Noah Fields
Noah Fields
13,985 Points

Now that there's an updated jQuery course, is this course also going to be updated/replaced soon?

Recently a new jQuery course replaced the old one linked in the Teacher's Notes for this video. Interestingly enough, the teacher Treasure Porth declared that jQuery is likely not needed anymore and it's possible that new developers may never use jQuery (though you'll likely run into it sooner or later, she did add). Given that this course uses jQuery, does that mean an updated version that attempts to use more "standard" javascript as opposed to jQuery, or something to that effect, will be added soon?

2 Answers

Kevin Gates
Kevin Gates
14,856 Points

Maybe Dave McFarland can give some insight here?

Roger Hwang
Roger Hwang
3,850 Points

I read and hear vanilla JS is good enough for DOM traversals/manipulations. Not sure about AJAX. Wasn't Jquery created to make life simpler? I tried vanilla JS for the DOM, but all the code does feel longer. Why are people moving away from Jquery since it's hard for me to see the benefits of Vanilla JS or what other tech are people replacing Jquery with?

Kevin Gates
Kevin Gates
14,856 Points

People are moving away from jQuery because of it's additional library size when used on a website. It's not enormous, but for some people if you're only doing a few (relatively) simple things, you can do it with Vanilla JavaScript without issue. Thereby avoiding the need to bring in jQuery. This means that people on slower connections may see the page load faster, etc. Additionally, since Vanilla JavaScript is the core of the language, if you want to learn another library (such as Vue, React, etc.), then you already have the basics down.

I think the biggest questions with jQuery are: how much will you really use the library? How big is your website already?

jQuery is definitely shorter to use, and easy to understand. I'd suggest for growth-sake that you only use jQuery if you know how to do the function with Vanilla JavaScript (this is more of a guideline than an actual rule. There are some jQuery functions that perform some complex JavaScript).