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C# C# Objects Object-Oriented Programming Initialization

Nick Torchio
Nick Torchio
912 Points

OO Code Challenge

I keep getting a hint that says "Does your constructor initialize the 'TongueLength' field to the value passed in?"

I don't think I understand what field and what value this is referring to. I've reviewed the video a few times but I still can't figure out what's missing.

Frog.cs
namespace Treehouse.CodeChallenges
{
    class Frog
    {
        public readonly int TongueLength;
        public Frog(int TongueLength)
        {
            TongueLength = 5;
        }
    }
}

2 Answers

Steven Parker
Steven Parker
229,921 Points

Here's a few hints:

  • the field is named TongueLength (it's what you made readonly in task 1)
  • the value to set it with is passed in to the constructor for Frog
  • you currently have the constructor argument also named TongueLength but that makes things complicated
  • the convention in the course is to name the argument like the field, but with a lower-case first letter
  • you should set the TongueLength using the passed argument, instead of the fixed value 5
Henrique Vignon
PLUS
Henrique Vignon
Courses Plus Student 6,415 Points

You shouldn't set a fixed value for the field inside the constructor, that's what the argument is there for, plus the argument cannot have the same name as the field.

Steven Parker
Steven Parker
229,921 Points

Actually, the argument can have the same name as the field, but then to access the field you have to prefix it with "this.", and reusing the name is considered bad practice.

Henrique Vignon
Henrique Vignon
Courses Plus Student 6,415 Points

Eh, sounds like more work than it's worth :P, but good to know, I was not aware of that.

Nick Torchio
Nick Torchio
912 Points

But what is the "field" and where is the value supposed to be "passed in" to?