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General Discussion

Owen Schebella
Owen Schebella
4,392 Points

Order of learning?

Hi people, have just finished the 'how to make a website and' 'CSS inyto' courses and the next course in the Front End Development track is JavaScript basics. Should I be moving onto JavaScript so soon or spending more time on additional HTML and CSS classes first? Thank you!

5 Answers

Hassan Sirelkhatim
seal-mask
.a{fill-rule:evenodd;}techdegree
Hassan Sirelkhatim
Full Stack JavaScript Techdegree Student 27,673 Points

I am no expert, but there is a reason why the track is made the way its made. Also, javascript is an essential tool in making websites so delving into to the interaction between html/css/javascript from now could be beneficial.

I agree, you are definitely going to see in more advanced websites the use of javascript to place more interactivity within the HTML and CSS. I think that the track combined these this way to have a basic understanding of each of these properties of a website (structure, look, & interactivity) before moving onto more advanced techniques in each discipline.

Ken Alger
STAFF
Ken Alger
Treehouse Teacher

Owen;

I kind of think of that particular track as an initial orientation to the realm of web design. It teaches you some of the initial basics and gets you a solid foundation from which to build. After going through it you may decide that, for example, you really don't like JavaScript but love CSS.

That's great, right? You know how the two can interact, and how they interact with HTML, but you can then learn more about CSS and SASS and not spend as much time on JavaScript. Of course you could enjoy other or all aspects of front-end design as well, this is just an example.

The other great thing I have found about the way Treehouse has that track laid out is that with the foundation of information it provides, it is highly useful in many other courses as well. For example, when you work through the Python Learn Flask track, knowing a bit about HTML and CSS certainly helps and advancing a Flask site with JavaScript becomes much more doable.

At any rate, keep working through the track, but if there is a topic that really intrigues you, such as CSS, take a break from the track and take some CSS specific courses before returning to the track. Your track progress will be saved and you will return to it with a broader knowledge base.

Happy coding,

Ken

Owen Schebella
Owen Schebella
4,392 Points

Thank you for the detailed response Ken! I guess I hadn't really thought of it as a way to help decide which areas I like best. Makes a lot of sense. Is it normal to find JavaScript a lot harder than HTML and CSS or this an early sign that it might not be suited to me? I'm new to all of it but haven't found myself frustrated/confused until the JavaScript track..

Ken Alger
Ken Alger
Treehouse Teacher

Owen Schebella, I was just using CSS vs. JavaScript as an example. Personally, while I found the initial learning curve for JavaScript to be higher than for CSS, I enjoy it more and find it more useful. Stick with it, it does start to make sense but there is indeed quite a bit to learn.

As I alluded to in my previous post, one of the great things about Treehouse is the ability to try new courses to see what is of interest and "clicks" for you. For example, I have taken some Ruby and WordPress courses here at Treehouse, but I have found other areas that are of more interest.

Ken