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General Discussion

Joshua Wolfe
Joshua Wolfe
1,897 Points

Should I dual boot Linux?

I really want to get into the mindset of a programmer through by regular study and transforming my mindset via GUI interface, regular media intake (news articles, books, podcasts), and regular study. That being said besides using iOS. Should I dual boot Linux?

(small explanation about the "besides iOS") I dont really like the interface, design, economy, or limitations of iOS. So I'll never use it, unless my future employer makes me; even then i'll resist. I just cant do it. I wont be discussing this topic further in this thread.

Joshua Wolfe
Joshua Wolfe
1,897 Points

*Side note I am working on an associates in web development at a local college in addition to studying on here.

2 Answers

Greg Kaleka
Greg Kaleka
39,018 Points

I don't think there's a real benefit to running a linux GUI in terms of learning programming or even getting into the "programmer mindset". Most programmers don't run linux.

There is a huge benefit to getting comfortable with a linux command line.

If you were on a Mac, the terminal on your own machine would be close enough - both are based on POSIX, and use the same commands for the most part. Since you're asking about dual booting, I assume you're on a Windows machine. In that case, dual booting might be worthwhile, simply because you'll have access to a linux terminal.

An alternative to dual booting would be to get yourself a linux virtual server set up. They're pretty cheap on DigitalOcean or on Linode. With that set up, you can SSH into them from your machine and be a command line monkey to your heart's content. Run scripts, set up a web server... whatever you're into.

You could also do this locally using virtual machines. These are a bit more annoying to set up and manage, but are free (or can be, anyway), and can be run locally without an internet connection. I've used VirtualBox in the past.

Hope this gets to the root of your question.

Cheers :beers:

-Greg

Tyler B
Tyler B
5,775 Points

Very much what Greg said, "programmer mindset" has zero to do with how you interact with a GUI and everything to do with your CLI interaction. If you're on Mac I'd recommend something like iTerm2 to make interacting with the command line a little easier but besides that you'll be hard pressed to tell the difference between OSX and Linux command line in general. If you're on Windows 10 you can simply install the Ubuntu CLI but there are some caveats to its configuration you may find confusing. If you're looking to get into the real start from scratch experience a virtual server is probably your best bet I've used DigitalOcean before myself and learned quite a bit. That being said I've been working as a software engineer for that last 7+ years now and primarily just use the CLI in Mac OSX w/ iTerm2.

Joshua Wolfe
Joshua Wolfe
1,897 Points

Thanks Greg. That is a lot to think about! I had not know about a virtual Linux server. That is very fascinating. I'll look into it. Thanks!

Joshua Wolfe
Joshua Wolfe
1,897 Points

I am a windows person. I use windows 10.

Thanks Tyler, that helps clear it up a bit. I'll look into the ubuntu CLI. As well as look up some course on CLI. It looks like setting up a virtual server might be the way to go.