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General Discussion

David Bouchare
David Bouchare
9,224 Points

Systems Administration/Engineering or IT

Hi everyone,

I was just wondering if there were any Treehouse students who are currently considering Systems Administration/Engineering or IT Admin as a potential career.

Although a lot of the tracks or courses provided here are more Development focussed, the Development Tools track and the fact that Python and Ruby can be used for Systems Engineering purposes make me think that some people might be interested in those area too. I am actually trying to get (back) into that field myself (having work in IT support in the past).

7 Answers

I'm thinking about pursuing linux sysadmin training eventually.

The problem is there are so many interesting areas of technology to learn. Right now, I should just be concentrating on one skillset to learn to find a better job (right now I do low-level telecommunications analyst work that only really involves rote memorization of systems and a bit of unix and copper/fiber circuit switching). Part of me is pulled toward getting deeper into unix, part of me wants to design sites using LAMP stacks, and the other part of me is pursing Ruby. I want to learn it all simultaneously, and it's causing me more frustration that it probably should.

David Bouchare
David Bouchare
9,224 Points

Yes I totally get your point. I tried Ruby on Rails, some JS, even CSS... Then a bit of Java here and there. As a result, I never really managed to produce anything significant in those areas.

Also, I have never been a good developer. Back in my university days I was a lot better at IT/Sys Admin. I now feel this is an area that I want to explore again, and certainly become better at scripting and develop a good understanding of some development principles, without pursuing a pure Development track or career.

However, as you pointed out, it's the focus that I was missing until now. I am also looking into the Linux Professional Institute Certification by the way.

James Barnett
James Barnett
39,199 Points

In the past few years there has come a trend in certain parts of the industry known as devops basically a developer that's learned about servers and databases to support large Linux infrastructure to run sites like Treehouse.

In order to that you first need a year or so professional experience as a python or ruby developer and then you need Linux (LPIC Level 3 is a good start), NoSQL (MongoDB for example) and Config Management (Chef, Puppet or Ansible) skills it's sort of an intermediate developer position that has no entry level counterpart.

Abdülhak Gözegir
Abdülhak Gözegir
4,689 Points

I'm new student in a university. I'm new in the developer area. . Some blogs say that PHP is dying and Ruby, python are popular.

I found that kind of chart ; http://www.indeed.com/jobtrends?q=ruby%2C+python%2C+javascript%2C+php%2C+java&l=&relative=1

I confused about which one I should learn now. I began with Android and it is a bit hard so I took a break to learn PHP but the new articles confuse me.

David Bouchare
David Bouchare
9,224 Points

As of June 2013, 75% of the "web" was powered by PHP, according to this thread: http://www.quora.com/Is-PHP-dead (not sure this figure is accurate but the point is that it is still widely used). Think about Facebook, for instance, which I'm sure still has plenty of PHP in its code base.

A lot of people are using Ruby and Python to build web apps, these days, that's a fact. It really depends on what you like doing, what you want to achieve, and which career track you want to try. Easy to say, not so easy to do sometimes, I know :)

James Barnett Thanks for the input, Linux, Databases and Configuration Management are areas I would want to dive into going forward too.

Abdülhak Gözegir
Abdülhak Gözegir
4,689 Points

Actually, I want to create dynamic and functional websites. Ruby, Python and PHP are in the same area. I have already started to learn PHP because I wanted to build a background for programming languages.

But now, as I said I still confused about should I start python now. Because it looks like more functional, easy to learn and some people say it is best for beginning.

David Bouchare
David Bouchare
9,224 Points

I see... I guess it's not really about the programming language in that case, the goal is to be able to achieve what you have in mind (in terms of building "dynamic and functional websites"). Have you started working on a (or several) project(s) already? If you have started learning PHP and already created something in that language, it might not be worth trying to rewrite everything in Python.

That's not to say that learning Python wouldn't be useful though...

James Barnett
James Barnett
39,199 Points

it might not be worth trying to rewrite everything in Python.

Pick a language, devote a year, learn it well.