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WordPress

Daniel Mironis
Daniel Mironis
14,023 Points

Third parties plugins in premium wordpress theme

Maybe are here experienced wordpress theme developers and could answer if I can use free third party plugins ( like Custom Post Type UI, Advanced Custom Fields Plugin etc) in wordpress theme which Im developing for selling, or should it be built in?

5 Answers

Scott Angle
Scott Angle
8,968 Points

This is only from my own experience, and I would certainly be more than happy for someone else to weigh in here as well, but there are a few ways you could approach this - I'll rate them in my opinion from best to worst:

  1. Recreate the desired functionality within your own code - this would be best as it provides a complete 'out of the box' solution for your customer.
  2. Bundle the plugins with your template package, with either automatic installation or instructions for the user on how to install the plugins. Not as good as it requires more work... However, ensure the original plugin developers get credited up front - I would do this by including in your functionality/capability lists a statement something like "Included: the superb plugins: {PLUGIN NAME} by {DEVELOPER NAME} & {PLUGIN NAME} by {DEVELOPER NAME}, etc...
  3. Within the admin dashboard or install files, you could include links to download files/plugins required for full functionality - putting the process in the user's hands - but even more work...
  4. Bundle the plugins with your theme, hoping no one notices, and wait for it to come back and bite you in the butt, because it will...

I hope this makes sense, and goes some way to answering your question.

All the best,

Scott

Matt Campbell
Matt Campbell
9,767 Points

Your theme should work with the majority of plug ins if you're looking to sell it however, if core functionality of the theme requires the use of these plugins you mentioned above, then that code should be written into the theme. Such as an event theme, you shouldn't use even plugins to handle the events side of things, you should write that code. But, if someone wanted to add a contact form to a page, then your theme should work with plugins so users can add that.

Zac Gordon
STAFF
Zac Gordon
Treehouse Guest Teacher

I like the approach of having a message display once you install the theme that says that you must install the following plugins, then list out those plugins. If they are free plugins you can write a script to let the user click on a button to automatically install them.

I would not suggest shipping them with your plugin if someone else wrote them, especially if it's a premium theme.

Daniel Mironis
Daniel Mironis
14,023 Points

Thanks everyone, now it makes sense to me. Also would be interesting to know from you guys, have you made or have experience in creating premium themes or plugins Zac, Matthew, Scott? Is it a good niche to jump in for experience or even profit?

Zac Gordon
STAFF
Zac Gordon
Treehouse Guest Teacher

Daniel Mironis I never saw it as a profitable venture worth the effort given the huge saturation. Instead I tried finding niche clients, buying a theme and customizing it for clients as my service.

Plus, your skill level has to be insanely high to build premium themes worth buying now.