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JavaScript Introduction to jQuery Hello, jQuery! Accessing and Modifying Attributes

Erick Luna
Erick Luna
20,282 Points

what is the difference between $('selector').click(); and $('selector').on(click,function(){}) in Jquery?

hello every one!! Can you say why to use one or the other sintax?

2 Answers

Steven Parker
Steven Parker
230,230 Points

Assuming you meant to write that as "$('selector').click(function(){});" and "$('selector').on('click',function(){})", then there's no difference. The ".click()" function is simply a shorthand for ".on('click', )"

There are, however, other ways to use ".on" when given different arguments, such as for creating delegated handlers.

Also, if you really intended to write ".click()" with no arguments, that fires an event instead of creating the listener for one.

Erick Luna
Erick Luna
20,282 Points

Thank you so much for your answer Steven

Dan Weru
Dan Weru
47,649 Points

Hi, the difference is in that one has an event listener. It is easier to explain with code.

$('selector').on(click, function(){
    // do something
});

the .on() function is a javascript event listener. It listens for events such as click, hover, submit, double click, mouseover, mouseleave etc. Notice that these events are often triggered by a user. When that event (the even specified in the first argument) occurs, the code specified in the second argument (known as a callback and is almost always a function) gets executed.

$('selector').click();

In the second snippet there is no event listener. The code get executed as the click event happens, with no prior anticipation.

That's how I understand it.

Erick Luna
Erick Luna
20,282 Points

Thank you so much for the answer, it is pretty useful for me

Dan Weru
Dan Weru
47,649 Points

You’re most welcome. Happy coding!