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WordPress

Jonathan Peck
Jonathan Peck
6,472 Points

What's the best CMS?

Hey, been rocking with Wordpress for awhile and was wondering if any of you all out there have had success, site update and client usability wise, with other CMS platforms....

15 Answers

James Barnett
James Barnett
39,199 Points

In a lot of cases Wordpress, Drupal & Joomla overly complicate matters particularly for clients. Consider using a lightweight CMS, something like Perch.

http://webdesignledger.com/tools/10-simple-and-light-weight-cms-solutions

Caroline Hagan
PLUS
Caroline Hagan
Courses Plus Student 12,453 Points

...of constant upgrades to the framework

I think you'll find updates to nearly all CMS systems available out there; it's there way of staying up-to-date, fixing bugs and security issues

... disable things you created months or years previously.

I found this myself when first starting off; it's trying to get the knack of learning the system so that it doesn't break if someone updates/upgrades i.e. not editing plugin code or using the hooks available

You know, on a business side of things people/customers would think, "Gee I paid for a website and followed the directions and now it doesn't work. I'll never use 'that guy' again!"

Again you're probably going to get this anyway; companies change their direction, staff, content, branding... and technologies obviously change how we do things and build things... so the websites built with tables back in the day, weren't wrong for the time, but are clearly not appropriate now.

I think it's a case of just finding what suits your level of experience/learning, and what is suitable for the client/project your working on :-) We were all n00bs once! (and still are in some respects!)

Joseph Wachira
Joseph Wachira
17,972 Points

Was trying Kirby a day ago and it's quite impressive. It builds on just files and folders and has tons of features that make it easy to use and be flexible as hell (Huh, just like they say it) :D

In my actual work we are using Adobe's CQ5. It's quite a robust CMS. I've worked with Wordpress and Joomla (Joomla SUCKS by the way); wordpress is quite good for making blogs or really simple things.

I really like to make my own things, from scratch you know. Django helped me a lot with that, by now I have a los of "re usable" modules. :)

Phillipe Nelson
Phillipe Nelson
5,743 Points

WordPress is by far the easiest for client usability. Drupal and Joomla are more robust but a real pain to work with.

Caroline Hagan
PLUS
Caroline Hagan
Courses Plus Student 12,453 Points

Personally I prefer Wordpress, I build all my sites in WP (unless there is a reason not too / better option for that project) ; I've built simple 'brochure' sites to large CMS-style websites - i find it very flexible!

I guess the answer is usually - well what do you want to do with the website? :-P

Jonathan Peck
Jonathan Peck
6,472 Points

I'm a total Noob, but I get concerned with the idea of constant upgrades to the framework that disable things you created months or years previously. You know, on a business side of things people/customers would think, "Gee I paid for a website and followed the directions and now it doesn't work. I'll never use 'that guy' again!"

I guess my real question is, what's the most sustainable...?

Jonathan Peck
Jonathan Peck
6,472 Points

Or even better how to keep up with those things...... 'Like I said noob...'

For clients I tend to favor systems that have very friendly editing experiences. WordPress and Concrete5 (http://www.concrete5.org/) are both good choices in that respect.

Thomas Ireland
PLUS
Thomas Ireland
Courses Plus Student 8,216 Points

I'm a big fan of MODX. Great for front-end devs who have little programming skills. Also great for those who do have programming skills, specifically PHP. Open source and growing but still doesn't have the recognition it deserves. http://modx.com

Joseph Wachira
Joseph Wachira
17,972 Points

I prefer WordPress although perch is a better preference for small sites.

Lovin' the exchange of ideas :)

James Barnett
James Barnett
39,199 Points

+1 for Kirby, I'm a fan

Joseph Wachira
Joseph Wachira
17,972 Points

To wrap up, I think there are lots of best CMS's out there, some simple and easy to use while others are complicated. The question still stands, "What's the best CMS?" To me, the best CMS is defined by what you want to accomplish. But because content strategy is a saviour, when choosing a CMS you might want to go with the one that delivers your content wherever you want to call it at.