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iOS

When you finish TeamTreehouse's entire Swift course, what skills can I put on resume my resume?

This is my first time learning a programming language. So from the top of my head: Swift Xcode Github iOS Tools Auto Layout

what else?

3 Answers

Dominic Bryan
Dominic Bryan
14,452 Points

You have the write idea, maybe include use of multi-threaded programming and parsing. BUT and a big BUT...

The treehouse course isn't designed to make a you developer as soon as you finish it, so putting things likes "Swift, iOS, xcode" on your resume could be very misleading to employers. Make sure you note that its basic skills in the following and then list these skills.

The only reason I say this is because although the skills you learn here you will use in programming for a long time, after completing the course that's merely the surface of the sea, you've still got the depths to learn.

Actually listing skills isn't the best thing to demonstrate your skill level in swift, projects are and funnily enough with that will bring along loads more skills (if you wish to list them all aha).

What I am saying is if you are going to list those skills make sure to note they are still basic and my actual advise would be to not even include it on your CV as skills but to wait, build a couple of your own apps, then add a whole section to your CV with skills and portfolio.

I don't mean for this to sound mean but you have to be careful, especially if this is your first programming language. There is not just writing code but knowing where to look and what to do when you need help and so on, its a big mess and it takes time to know what it is you are looking for.

Stick at it though and don't forget if you complete the course you have 3 portfolio entries right there. Hope this was helpful.

Thanks

Dom

Patrick Cooney
Patrick Cooney
12,216 Points

I wouldn't use the apps from the course as portfolio pieces either. All that proves is that you can follow instructions well. Take the principles from the videos and create your own apps.

After completing the entire Swift course, will I know enough and be able to say that when applying to Jr. iOS Developer positions in the future?

Not meaning to sound rude, but why have so many courses and quizzes on this site if all the people who complete the tutorials will not be able to get a job (skill competence wise)? By learning all the material on this site, what skills do I develop and what can I be confident to say to future employers after finishing this course?

Thank you for your great insight Dominic Bryan!

Patrick Cooney
Patrick Cooney
12,216 Points

You will know many of the fundamental skills needed for a Jr. dev but that doesn't mean you have the experience necessary. You also need to consider that with Swift being brand new it would be hard to find someone willing to hire a person who only knows Swift unless you're looking for consulting jobs starting apps from scratch. Any other iOS job is going to rely heavily on knowledge of Objective-C. Most iOS jobs will mean inheriting a legacy code base full of Objective-C. The other thing that you didn't list which is more important than the tools is problem solving. Problem solving skills in the context of coding are something that take a while to develop (no pun intended). The more code you write the better you get at problem solving.

The courses and quizzes on this site aren't meant to be the end point. They are to teach you the basics so that you can apply them to your own apps and build experience from there. Come up with an app idea and build it. Then do it again and again. That said, if you have one killer app instead of several small apps, that might be enough to impress potential employers.

Dominic Bryan
Dominic Bryan
14,452 Points

I agree with Patrick Cooney 's points, also when I say use your apps you build on the course in your portfolio try adapt them, change them, build something better with a base you built from this course. I also agree with Patrick's view on Jr.Dev position, at least for the next couple of years you are very unlikely to be hired with just Swift skills, learning Objective-C will be very helpful.

You don't sound rude, when you are committing time and money to learn from somewhere such as treehouse its final to get the details and be skeptical. As myself and patrick mentioned look at treehouse as laying down the basics with some certain difficult skills built in (i.e. Grand Central Dispatch, multi threading), and also remember treehouse's growing forum community and video library for new content to give you something else to work with.

Also its hard to really represent skills by jsut typing a list of them out, its all well and good writing down loads of skills but as mentioned before, building a few apps that use these skills is much more beneficial to you. What I did was take the apps I built from the Swift track and changed them and add new things to advance my skills and learn others. Then you can include them in your portfolio :)

Dom

Patrick Cooney and Dominic Bryan Thank you for your insight, I really appreciate it.

I know this question has been asked a trillion times and I might sound like a broken record at this point, but I have a year left of school and my brain is convinced that I should ignore Obj-C and go all in for Swift. My brain is convinced that Swift will have a job market in one year. I feel that if I learn Obj-C now, I will get a job, but the time will come where I have to dedicate time to learning Swift and I'll probably drop Obj-C after using it for a couple years.

Do you think it's naive to learn everything about Swift for about a year while ignoring Obj-C completely until I graduate (approx 1 year)? My brain thinks long term (probably need to work on more problem solving for long term..), but how do I decide that my thought process has any merit to it or if know if it's just wishful thinking? I've always had a great ability for making wrong decisions and I fear that this may be one of them.

Hope you understand my fear of trusting my self-judgement.

Patrick Cooney
Patrick Cooney
12,216 Points

This may sound harsh but to be honest — yes 100% naive. See this answer I posted just yesterday. One of Apple's own Swift documentation engineers told myself and another guy at one of the WWDC labs that Objective-C will be around for a long, long time.

That said if you only ever plan to make your own apps for sale in the app store or you plan to freelance making apps for other non-technical people, you may be able to get away with Swift only.

Thank you Patrick Cooney, that is what my mind needed to hear in order to be convinced. If Apple's own Swift documentation engineer says so, I don't know who else who would have more credibility than him.

As a beginner in programming, is it harder to learn Obj-C than Swift? The pointers and brackets are very daunting and scary. Please let me know your thoughts! Thank you so much.

Dominic Bryan
Dominic Bryan
14,452 Points

wow thats interesting to here Patrick Cooney I also thought maybe 5 years from now Apple would have really pushed Swift into our heads! but thanks for that this conversation has also opened my eyes, thanks Jason McCoy

From my experience you will see the use of similar methods and phrases across both languages. As patrick said Swift at the end of the day is almost built off of Obj-C, but if you have only done Swift and no other language it will be slightly daunting at first, but as far as skills go, the ability to learn other languages is something employers look for. I agree though, you may graduate in a year so set yourself the target of having both apps in swift and obj-c. I have gone looking for help with some swift code and never found it, then found a similar solution in obj-c and just worked it into swift, so the ability to do this is very useful

Dom

Patrick Cooney
Patrick Cooney
12,216 Points

Objective-C will definitely be tougher. One of the main goals of Swift was to make it easy for beginners to learn. Objective-C will be complicated but once you have the basic syntax down it's not all that bad. I actually really enjoy writing Objective-C code. I wouldn't say I'm avoiding Swift but at this point it's more important to know Objective-C if I want an iOS job so all my code is still in Obj-C.