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CSS Compass Basics Getting Started with Compass Installing Compass

Vince Usher
Vince Usher
7,159 Points

Why do the tutors make such a big deal out of having to use the command line? Are people really that scared of it IRL?

Like if I'm looking to become a digital producer, and I want to set up a friendly environment for front end devs and back end devs, am I going to have to incorporate these other GUI apps into workflow because people won't know how to use the command line?

Like is it even acceptable/possible to be a front end dev that doesn't know how to use the command line in the industry?

I personally love using the command line, reminds me of when the girl was hacking into the system to open door locks in Jurassic Park.

5 Answers

Iago Wandalsen Prates
Iago Wandalsen Prates
21,699 Points

Yeah, lots of people, principally people that are more on the design part of building a website, are afraid of the command line. I've worked for 1 year in a digital marketing agency, and while I did use my command line tools, there was a guy who never touched it. It's not acceptable to good developers, but the market is crowded with people who didn't learned from bad resources, don't really care about best practices. They don't use css pre compilers, they don't use stuff like grunt, or git, and they exist, in a bigger number than you'd imagine.

You need to know who's your target market in order to decide wether or not doing a command-line only thing, but you should be fine doing it.

James Barnett
James Barnett
39,199 Points

Realistically most everything you need to know to get started with Sass is covered in the Getting Started with the Console badge in the Console Foundations course.

Hi guys,

I was eavesdropping your conversation and this command line thing caught my attention. I'm new to all this but does it have something to do with the console?

I'm sure stuff comes up in the coming treehouse courses but I'm just curious guy, I guess.

Thanks!

Vince Usher
Vince Usher
7,159 Points

Yeah, it's pretty much imperative you learn how to use the console, aka (the command line) when you get to sass and compass etc.

I recommend doing the console basics course before doing the sass basics course.

I will do that.

What about Sass and Compass compared to Less? They do the same things, right?

Which one do you prefer?

And is it that Bootstrap focuses more on Less.

Sorry, I'm full of questions.

Thanks!

Vince Usher
Vince Usher
7,159 Points

I like Sass, Compass and Bootstrap. Bootstrap is just an external framework. Sass is more flexible than less because it has conditionals etc.

I'd recommend Sass over less everytime. Others might have a different opinion though.

Iago Wandalsen Prates
Iago Wandalsen Prates
21,699 Points

Its easier to find good resources to learn sass than less (sass has treehouse and codeschool) But when you are developing in a javascript environment, like node, its might be better to use a javascript pre-compiler like less or stylus, or even lib-sass, instead of sass.

In the end, is more of a preference choice, I personally prefer sass because compass is awesome, and I've already learned it, I don't have to start learning a new syntax to do what I can already do pretty well.

Thanks Vince.

I'm about to start Sass course in Code School. I look forward to it. I'm also trying to get into Wordpress theme development, too. It's been a wild ride learning all this stuff and after about a year banging my head against the wall, things are starting to make sense slowly.

No pain no gain, I guess :)