CSS CSS Basics (2014) Basic Selectors Pseudo-Classes

Why is it called a:link and not a:unvisited?

It's a: visited, so why isn't it just simple as a:unvisited too?

style.css
/* Complete the challenge by writing CSS below */
index.html
<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
  <head>
    <title>Lake Tahoe</title>
    <link rel="stylesheet" href="page.css">
    <link rel="stylesheet" href="style.css">
  </head>
  <body> 
    <header>
      <span>Journey through the Sierra Nevada Mountains</span>
      <h1>Lake Tahoe, California</h1>
    </header>
    <p>
      Lake Tahoe is one of the most breathtaking attractions located in California. It's home to a number of ski resorts, summer outdoor recreation, and tourist attractions. Snow and skiing are a significant part of the area's reputation.
    </p>
    <a href="#">Find out more</a>
    <div>
      <h2>Check out all the Wildlife</h2>
      <p>
        As spawning season approaches, the fish acquire a humpback and protuberant jaw. After spawning, they die and their carcasses provide a feast for gatherings of mink, bears, and Bald eagles.
      </p>
      <a href="#">See the Wildlife</a>
    <div>
    <h3>From Tents to Resorts</h3>
    <p>
    Lake Tahoe is full of wonderful places to stay. You have the ability to sleep in the outdoors in a tent, or relax like a king at a five star resort. Here are our top three resorts:
    </p>
    <ul>
      <li><a href="#">Lake Tahoe Resort Hotel</a></li>
      <li><a href="#">South Lake Tahoe Resorts</a></li>
      <li><a href="#">Tahoe Ski Resort Lodging</a></li>
    </ul>
  </body>
</html>

1 Answer

Steven Parker
Steven Parker
205,347 Points

There isn't any CSS facility to target only unvisited links. The ":link" pseudo-class only refers to "unvisited" when you have a rule established for ":visited" that overrides it.

By itself, it affects all links, and thus the name.

Could you possibly dumb it down a lot?

Steven Parker
Steven Parker
205,347 Points

Let me try stating it another way. The "a:link" selector targets all the links, including visited ones. That's why it's not called "unvisited".

But when you create another rule for "a:visited", that one will take over handling all the visited links. Then "a:link" is left handling only the unvisited ones.