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Python Python Collections (Retired) Dungeon Game Planning Our Dungeon

Andrés Angelini
PLUS
Andrés Angelini
Courses Plus Student 22,744 Points

Introducing "Dungeon Escape"; my answer to the Python Dungeon Challenge

Hi, Kenneth Love.

I just wanted to share what I came up with for the Dungeon Challenge and would very much appreciate if you and the community could give me your invaluable input.

First of all, I have to recognize that I had a lot of fun making this game. So much so that it was very difficult for me to resist that itchy temptation of adding more and more features. So, I first tried to achieve the bare minimum and once that was done, I gave it ago to two extra challenges: printing a map which updates the player's position in real-time and then adding those delicious breadcrumbs to aid the player a little bit.

There a lot of new features that could be added. I invite anyone to do so if they wish. One that immediately came to my mind once I added the map was to let the user choose between different difficulty levels. Depending which the player chooses you could, for example, hide the map. We could also add more monsters as well as give them the ability to move. And so you could go on and on like this. Do you guys see now why is such a good practice to stick to getting a Minimum Viable Product the teachers at Treehouse have taught us about? ; )

Anyways, I digress. Coming back to the main point, I'll leave you with a snapshot:

https://w.trhou.se/mr8bi4ppao

If for some reason you can't open it, here it is:

"""
DUNGEON ESCAPE
==============
A tiny game meant to be enjoyed from the comfort of your
terminal. The idea is simple: the player is in a dungeon
and must escape from a monster by moving one step at a time
in any of the four directions until finding the exit door.
The player loses by moving into the same spot as the
monster, and wins by reaching the exit door.
"""


import os
import random
import sys

def clear_screen():
    if os.name == 'nt':
        os.system('cls')
    else:
        os.system('clear')

# Notify user of his/her location.
def print_coor(player):
    print("Your coordinates now are x: {}, y:"
              " {}.".format(player['x'], player['y']))

def print_help():
    print("Type a command to execute the desired action:\n"
          "'up' -> go up\n"
          "'down' -> go down\n"
          "'left' -> go left\n"
          "'right' -> go right\n"
          "'help' -> show help\n"
          "'quit' -> exit the game\n")

def exit_game():
    print("Exiting into the light...")
    sys.exit()

def play_again():
    try:
        user_response = input("Would you like to try your luck again? "
                              "Y/n\n> ").lower()
    except ValueError:
        print("What did you say? Y/n\n> ")
    else:
        if user_response == 'n':
            exit_game()
        else:
            play()

def print_map(x_axis, y_axis, player, player_traces):
    # Start by drawing the top of the map.
    map = "+" + ("---+" * max(x_axis)) + "\n"

    # Draw line by line. Since the origin is located
    # at the bottom left corner, use the reversed order
    # of the y axis.
    for y in reversed(y_axis):
        map += "|"

        # For each quadrant, draw a space and decide what
        # to fill it with depending on what's in there;
        # the player, a trace, or just empty space.
        for x in x_axis:
            if x == player['x'] and y == player['y']:
                fill = "X"
            elif (x, y) in player_traces:
                fill = "*"
            else:
                fill = " "
            map += " {} ".format(fill)
            if x == max(x_axis):
                map += "|\n"
            else:
                map += " "

        # Draw the decoration between lines.
        if y > min(y_axis):
            map += "+" + ("    " * (max(x_axis) - 1)) + "   +\n"

    # Finish it off by drawing the bottom of the map.
    map += "+" + ("---+" * max(x_axis))
    print(map)

def play():
    clear_screen()

    # Create a map of coordinates.
    x_axis = tuple(range(1, 11))
    y_axis = tuple(range(1, 11))

    # Put the player on the map.
    player = {'x': random.choice(x_axis), 'y': random.choice(y_axis)}

    # Create a trace the player will leave as he/she moves around.
    player_traces = []

    # Put the monster on the map while making sure it won't
    # appear in the same spot as the player.
    monster_spawn_area_x = list(x_axis)
    monster_spawn_area_x.remove(player['x'])
    monster_spawn_area_y = list(y_axis)
    monster_spawn_area_y.remove(player['y'])
    monster = {'x': random.choice(monster_spawn_area_x), 'y': random.choice(monster_spawn_area_y)}

    # Put the exit door, again making sure not to place it
    # in the same place as the player or the monster.
    door_spawn_area_x = monster_spawn_area_x
    door_spawn_area_x.remove(monster['x'])
    door_spawn_area_y = monster_spawn_area_y
    door_spawn_area_y.remove(monster['y'])
    door = {'x': random.choice(door_spawn_area_x), 'y': random.choice(door_spawn_area_y)}

    print("######################## DUNGEON "
          "ESCAPE #############################\n\n")            
    print("Welcome to 'Dungeon Escape': an adrenaline packed horror game "
          "back from a time when nobody knew what the hell a GUI was.\n\n"
          "Find your way out from the dungeon by moving one step at a time "
          "without being noticed by the evil monster lurking in the "
          "shadows. Good luck! "
          "You are gonna need it.\n\n")
    # Tell the user how to play the game from the very start.
    print_help()
    print("The dungeon's size is 10 by 10. You can move one step at a time.")
    print_coor(player)
    print_map(x_axis, y_axis, player, player_traces)

    while True:
        # Let the player be able to move one step at a time.
        try:
            direction = input("> ").lower()
        except ValueError:
            print("Invalid direction. Try again.")
        else:
            clear_screen()

            # Make help available to the player at any time.
            if direction == 'help':
                print_help()
            # Let the player leave the game at any moment.
            elif direction == 'quit':
                exit_game()
            elif direction == 'up':
                # Don't let the player go beyond the top border.
                if (player['y'] + 1) > max(y_axis):
                    print('You hit a wall. Try going in another direction.')
                else:
                    print('Went UP one step.')
                    player_traces.append(tuple([player['x'], player['y']]))
                    player['y'] += 1
            elif direction == 'down':
                # Don't let the player go beyond the bottom border.
                if (player['y'] - 1) < min(y_axis):
                    print('You hit a wall. Try going in another direction.')
                else:
                    print('Went DOWN one step.')
                    player_traces.append(tuple([player['x'], player['y']]))
                    player['y'] -= 1
            elif direction == 'left':
                # Don't let the player go beyond the left border.
                if (player['x'] - 1) < min(x_axis):
                    print('You hit a wall. Try going in another direction.')
                else:
                    print('Went LEFT one step.')
                    player_traces.append(tuple([player['x'], player['y']]))
                    player['x'] -= 1
            elif direction == 'right':
                # Don't let the player go beyond the right border.
                if (player['x'] + 1) > max(x_axis):
                    print('You hit a wall. Try going in another direction.')
                else:
                    print('Went RIGHT one step.')
                    player_traces.append(tuple([player['x'], player['y']]))
                    player['x'] += 1
            else:
                print('Wrong direction. Try again.')

        # Notify user of his/her new location.
        print_coor(player)
        print_map(x_axis, y_axis, player, player_traces)

        # Make character die if it lands on the monster.
        if player['x'] == monster['x'] and player['y'] == monster['y']:
            # Player loses the game if character dies and the game ends.
            print("As soon as you step into a new area, you are caught by "
                  "the nefarious creature who drags you to the very doors of hell.")
            # Ask user if he/she wants to play again once game is over.
            play_again()

        # Player wins if character reaches the door.
        if player['x'] == door['x'] and player['y'] == door['y']:
            print("You find the exit! Without looking back you run desperately "
                  "while feeling the ominus presence rushing after you. But "
                  "you finally make it through in one peace. The door closes "
                  "and you never look back. Congratulations!")
            # Ask user if he/she wants to play again once game is over.
            play_again()

play()

Cheers!

Chris Freeman
Chris Freeman
Treehouse Moderator 68,064 Points

Very nicely done! You should consider adding this to your GitHub account! (create one if you don't already have one!)

Andrés Angelini
Andrés Angelini
Courses Plus Student 22,744 Points

Thanks Chris! You're right, I should. But to be completely honest, I've been avoiding Github because I would like to support companies that are a little bit more open source friendly, like GitLab, whose very own platform is open source. Also, I don't think it's a good idea to depend too much on a single company.

Having said this, however, I'm feeling more and more pressured to end up using it, seeing how many employers ask for a Github account. Even though it's basically the same, I have had job interviews where the interviewer didn't know GitLab even existed. I still would like to avoid Github but...

Anyways. Thanks a lot again. I'll set up a repository as soon as I can. I'm still going through the Python Track, doing the Object-Oriented Python, though, so rather than improving the code, I would like to focus back again in the course.