Welcome to the Treehouse Community

The Treehouse Community is a meeting place for developers, designers, and programmers of all backgrounds and skill levels to get support. Collaborate here on code errors or bugs that you need feedback on, or asking for an extra set of eyes on your latest project. Join thousands of Treehouse students and alumni in the community today. (Note: Only Treehouse students can comment or ask questions, but non-students are welcome to browse our conversations.)

Looking to learn something new?

Treehouse offers a seven day free trial for new students. Get access to thousands of hours of content and a supportive community. Start your free trial today.

General Discussion

David Forero
David Forero
5,492 Points

What is the best way to learn using the Teamtreehouse method?

I know that following method would be watch the screencasts, complete the quizzes and challenges, but what has worked best for you? I have had some blanks in my learning in Treehouse with concepts that have been more complex. What are some tips from the seasoned Treehouse students. Is it best to follow along? Watch several times?

What i do and it's proved to help me a lot is to watch a whole project and follow it along. Once i finished that i will then set myself a deadline sort of like a challenge to build something using the same techniques i've learnt but adding extras i.e i recently did the build a simple iPhone app for swift and then built my own app which is now on the app store here's the link my app

But it's best to do something that will solve a problem you have at the moment i.e you don't have a good app for reminders, you don't have a nice wallpaper for your computer or you don't have a website these are all things you can build using what you've learnt.

I use to have the same problem thinking building something complex will help you but when you really think about it and you build your first product it doesn't have to be complicated it just has to be reliable and easy to use and there are tons of other sites to help you if you ever get stuck hope this helps you

6 Answers

Macie Smith
Macie Smith
1,599 Points

I find the most benefit from doing hands-on work. I follow along and do the steps along with the videos, and then I apply what I'm learning to my own projects right away.

James Barnett
James Barnett
39,199 Points

+1 That's my primary suggest to everyone.

Nkosi Ndlovu
Nkosi Ndlovu
9,652 Points

Well, I'd say it differs from person to person. Personally I like to watch a video then leave treehouse and watch as many videos on the subject as possible then come back to the quiz or challenge. eg: if I am learning about Javascript Functions, I will look functions up from many resources on the web till I can explain/teach them them to somebody else. It's slow but works for me.

*Someone suggested a study group here (https://teamtreehouse.com/forum/anyone-else-want-to-be-on-a-elearning-team) .

David Forero
David Forero
5,492 Points

Thanks for your help.

Douglas Miles
Douglas Miles
2,193 Points

also found this post helpful https://teamtreehouse.com/forum/youtube-video-how-i-made-8000-points-in-30-days It is really just 10 ways to add to your treehouse experience.

Christy Zimmer Coyle
Christy Zimmer Coyle
3,014 Points

I like Tunde's answer. I personally need to start doing what I'm learning more.

But, here's what's worked well for me so far:

I read the transcript of each video first and take notes on what seems important. Then I watch the video and add to my notes anything else that jumps out at me, as well as code examples that don't come across well in the transcript.

I didn't do that with the first section of the track I'm on, but I feel like I've retained a lot more on this section using this method. And I have good notes to look back on if I do forget something.

I take a much different approach than what has been listed so far - go through the material as quickly as possible with the goal being simply to impart familiarity rather than obtain mastery. Being familiar with a concept or technology allows you to later ask the right questions when inevitably using your favorite search engine to solve a problem (or implement a cool new widget). I've come to accept my knowledge gaps and have learned that I'm able to fill those gaps on-demand in many cases - with the caveat being those gaps aren't too far from my current reach.